Ben Stiller behind the scenes of The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013)

Ben Stiller behind the scenes of The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013)

giseducenter:

Check it out! Here’s a map of all the ways US cities have been destroyed through the creativity of Hollywood. Source.

(via embracethesunshine)

christophwaltz:

Kevin Spacey for The Hollywood Reporter, April 2014

At 54, Spacey is in his prime, eagerly pursuing new obsessions and exalting in his contradictory status in Hollywood as a big-name star who operates like an eccentric outsider.

christophwaltz:

Kevin Spacey for The Hollywood Reporter, April 2014

At 54, Spacey is in his prime, eagerly pursuing new obsessions and exalting in his contradictory status in Hollywood as a big-name star who operates like an eccentric outsider.

christophwaltz:

Kevin Spacey for The Hollywood Reporter, April 2014

At 54, Spacey is in his prime, eagerly pursuing new obsessions and exalting in his contradictory status in Hollywood as a big-name star who operates like an eccentric outsider.

christophwaltz:

Kevin Spacey for The Hollywood Reporter, April 2014

At 54, Spacey is in his prime, eagerly pursuing new obsessions and exalting in his contradictory status in Hollywood as a big-name star who operates like an eccentric outsider.

christophwaltz:

Kevin Spacey for The Hollywood Reporter, April 2014

At 54, Spacey is in his prime, eagerly pursuing new obsessions and exalting in his contradictory status in Hollywood as a big-name star who operates like an eccentric outsider.

(via amyseimetz)


Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)
eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                         
April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."
- Brock Peters
"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."
- Lauren Bacall

eldredpeck:

Happy Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!                                                                                        

April 5th 1916 - June 12th 2003

"In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."

- Brock Peters

"He was no saint, but he was a man of extraordinary gifts. Of course, he was tall, dark and handsome, but actually more than that - he was dazzling."

- Lauren Bacall

(via smellslike-hollywood)


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.


Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.

Favorite Films // One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest [1975]

What do you think you are, for Chrissake, crazy or somethin’? Well you’re not! You’re not! You’re no crazier than the average asshole out walkin’ around on the streets and that’s it.

(via cinemamonamour)

nock-nock-nock:

Scarlett Johansson nock-nock-nock:

Scarlett Johansson nock-nock-nock:

Scarlett Johansson nock-nock-nock:

Scarlett Johansson
terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!Born Marlon Brando, Jr.April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.”    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment.     Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”
-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!
Born Marlon Brando, Jr.
April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.
    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.
    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.
    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment. 
    Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”

-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer

(via amyseimetz)

“And I always heard people in New York never get to know their neighbors” “And I always heard people in New York never get to know their neighbors” “And I always heard people in New York never get to know their neighbors” “And I always heard people in New York never get to know their neighbors”
And I always heard people in New York never get to know their neighbors
Anjelica Huston and her then boyfriend, Jack Nicholson, at Telluride Film Festival in 1975, when the actor was lauded for “being perfectly attuned to the mystic vibrations of a particular period.”

(via cinemamonamour)


Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

(via amyseimetz)


James Spader as Steff in Pretty in Pink (1986)

James Spader as Steff in Pretty in Pink (1986)

James Spader as Steff in Pretty in Pink (1986)

James Spader as Steff in Pretty in Pink (1986)
James Spader as Steff in Pretty in Pink (1986)

(via deadlinecom)

artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards
Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title

artofthetitle:

Wes Anderson movie logos and title cards

Moonrise Kingdom on Art of the Title

(via amyseimetz)